Frequently Asked Questions

Guidelines for Submitting Artwork

Q What format should my images be for printing?
Q How do I save image files?
Q What is the difference between spot and process colours?
Q What is camera ready artwork?
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Q What is a "bleed"?
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Image Formats: What format should my images be for printing?

We prefer to receive photographic images as either tiff or eps, however we can work with jpeg as long as the resolution is at 300 dpi or better.
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Saving Images: How do I save image files?

All print quality photos should be saved with a resolution of at least 300 dpi for best results. Images from a web site are not usually suitable for print unless they are 300 dpi JPG's. Save photos at actual size or larger, we can modify them here if necessary. CMYK colour format preferred. Black and white artwork should be scanned at the highest resolution available.

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Spot or Process? What is the difference between spot or process colours?

Process colours are made up of the 4 colours in varying percentages otherwise known as CMYK, whereas a spot colour is a single ink colour that is mixed manually to a certain shade. For example...

CMYK Reflex Blue is made up of 100%C 73%M 0%Y 2%K resulting in 4 inks laid on top of one another to produce the desired colour...

the spot colour Reflex Blue is one ink only resulting in one pass of the press as opposed to three.

There are pros and cons to their usage and costs, enquire if you are unsure what is best for your application

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What is camera ready artwork?

Digital Files are preferred these days and reduce costs substantially.

To be considered camera ready, artwork must be received as black ink on white paper for ease and accuracy of scanning.

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Watermark or Screened?

A watermark is a background image or text on a page of a document which often verifies authenticity of authorship or release authority...like a company name or logo on top of an image to verify that the image belongs to them.

A "screened image" is a very faint image in the background so text placed on top can be easily read.
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What is a bleed?

Artwork that extends past the edge of a page is called a bleed. When it is designed, artwork is extended 1/8" or 1/16" past the page border so that after the job is printed on larger paper than required it can be trimmed to the required size. Then the printing appears to bleed off the edge of the printed piece.
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How can I proof artwork before it is printed?

All jobs are proofed by PDF or hard copy proof BEFORE printing to ensure you get what you expect.

A PDF allows you to see artwork very close to how it will look when job is completed. You will need to have Acrobat Reader installed in order to view these files. It is available as a free download at http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/main.html

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What is a PMS colour?

The Pantone Matching System (PMS) was developed to allow accurate colour matching.

A standard swatch book has printed shades of each colour in it and the exact ink mix required to achieve that shade. There are swatch books for both spot and process colours. A PMS 285 is the exact same shade used by designers and printers anywhere in the world.

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How do I save & send files?

* all photos must be saved with a resolution of 300 dpi.
* images from a web site are not usually suitable for print ...however we can work with a JPG as long as the resolution is at 225 - 300 dpi

* save photos at actual size or larger.

CMYK colour format required - all colours must be percentages of CMYK,

Acceptable Formats:

We have an extensive collection of industry software in both PC and Mac platforms, therefore we are able to open most files sent to us & convert them to an adequate format if necessary. If in doubt ...please contact us & we will be glad to answer any question or offer any advice you may need.

The following is a general guideline for acceptable formats...for a more extensive list please refer to the "Guidelines For Submitting Artwork" section of this web site.

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